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France Takes World Cup With 4-2 Win Over Croatia

France has clinched its second World Cup title with a 4-2 win over Croatia in a dramatic final in Moscow featuring a series of firsts and a pitch invasion orchestrated by Russian protest group Pussy Riot.

 

France led 2-1 at halftime courtesy of the first own-goal and the first video-reviewed penalty in a World Cup final. The own-goal off the top of Mario Mandzukic’s head was the 12th of the tournament. That’s double the previous World Cup record of six.

 

Croatia rallied to equalize on a terrific left-foot strike by Ivan Perisic, but France took the lead right back when Perisic handled the ball in the area. Argentine referee Nestor Pitana initially didn’t call the handball but awarded the spot kick after a video review. Antoine Griezmann converted the penalty to put France back in front.

 

Four pitch invaders disrupted the game in the 52nd minute for about a minute before being dragged away by security and police. Punk rock group Pussy Riot quickly claimed responsibility for the pitch invasion via social media, saying it was a protest aimed at ending illegal arrests of protesters and to allow political competition in Russia.

 

Play resumed and France quickly took a 4-1 lead with goals from Paul Pogba and Kylian Mbappe in the 59th and 65th minutes before Mario Mandzukic pulled one back for the Croatians in the 69th.

 

Croatia was playing in its first World Cup final. For France, it was a first World Cup crown since winning on home soil in 1998.

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Trump Labels Russia, China and Europe as ‘Foes’

U.S. President Donald Trump is branding Russia, China and the European Union as “foes” of the United States, but specifically is singling out long-time allies in Europe for taking advantage of the United States on trade deals.

“I think we have a lot of foes,” the U.S. leader told CBS News in an interview broadcast Sunday that was taped the day before at his Turnberry golf course in Scotland.

“I think the European Union is a foe, what they do to us in trade,” he said. “Now, you wouldn’t think of the European Union, but they’re a foe. Russia is foe in certain respects. China is a foe economically, certainly they are a foe. But that doesn’t mean they are bad. It doesn’t mean anything. It means that they are competitive.”

“I respect the leaders of those countries,” Trump said, referring to the European Union. “But, in a trade sense, they’ve really taken advantage of us and many of those countries are in NATO and they weren’t paying their bills” to meet the NATO goal of each of the 29 member states of the Western military alliance spending two percent of the size of their national economies on defense.

Trump criticized Germany, as he had last week before a contentious NATO summit in Brussels, for its deal with Russia to build a natural gas pipeline in the Baltic Sea that will send send fuel from Russia to Germany.

“Germany made a pipeline deal with Russia,” Trump said. “Where they’re going to be paying Russia billions and billions of dollars a year for energy, and I say that’s not good, that’s not fair. You’re supposed to be fighting for someone and then that someone gives billions of dollars to the one you’re, you know, guarding against. I think it’s ridiculous, so I let that be known also this time. I’ll tell you what, there’s a lot of anger at the fact that Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars. There’s a lot of anger. I also think it’s a very bad thing for Germany. Because it’s like, what, are they waving a white flag?”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who grew up in communist East Germany, rebuffed Trump’s criticism last week, saying that she had “experienced myself how a part of Germany was controlled by the Soviet Union” and said she was glad her country today, with communist East Germany and democratic West Germany united since 1990, can set “independent policies” and make “independent decisions.”

Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, dismissed Trump’s attack on European countries, saying, “America and the EU are best friends. Whoever says we are foes is spreading fake news,” employing one of Trump’s favorite pejoratives for news stories he does not like.

 

The European Union, which last year had a $151 billion trade surplus with the United States, is engaged in a contentious dispute over import tariffs with the United States, imposing higher levies on such iconic U.S. products as bourbon, jeans and motorcycles after Trump boosted U.S. tariffs on aluminum and steel imports from Europe.

 

 

 

 

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Фільм українського режисера переміг на кінофестивалі в Єревані

Трагікомедія «Вулкан» українського режисера Романа Бондарчука переміг в ігровій номінації на кінофестивалі «Золотий абрикос» у столиці Вірменії Єревані. Про це повідомляється на сайті фестивалю.

Історія розповідає про перекладача ОБСЄ Лукаса, який опиняється один серед українських степів.

Ця стрічка є повнометражним ігровим дебютом Бондарчука, який раніше був відомий як режисер документальних фільмів. Її знімали в копродукції Україна та Німеччина, світова прем’єра відбулася на фестивалі 2 липня у Карлових Варах (Чехія). У 2015-му році сценарій фільму, створений Романом Бондарчуком, Дар’єю Аверченко та Аллою Тютюнник отримав премію Міжнародного літературного конкурсу «Коронація слова».

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Trump Lowers Expectations for Putin Summit; Slams EU

Just hours ahead of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, U.S. President Donald Trump has both lowered expectations for the talks and issued a stunning rebuke of what has traditionally been one of Washington’s closest allies.

 

“Well I think we have a lot of foes,” Trump told CBS News when asked who he thinks is the U.S.’ biggest enemy. “I think the European Union is a foe. Now you wouldn’t think of the European Union, but they’re a foe.”  Trump also said Russia is a foe “in certain respects.”

 

European Council President Donald Tusk quickly responded on Twitter: “America and the EU are best friends. Whoever says we are foes is spreading fake news.”

 

Trump’s comments were broadcast as he headed for Helsinki, Finland, where on Monday he will hold his first official summit with Putin. Trump says he will use the meeting to find areas of cooperation with Putin, who is also critical of Western institutions such as NATO and the EU.

 

“Nothing bad’s gonna come out of it, and maybe some good will come out,” Trump said. “But I go in with low expectations. I’m not going with high expectations. I don’t really, I can’t tell you what’s going to happen.”

He also issued a series of tweets as he headed for Helsinki, saying no matter how well he does at the summit he would “return to criticism that it wasn’t good enough.”

Trump and Putin, according to diplomatic sources, are set to meet one-on-one, with only interpreters present, for 30 minutes to an hour, before wider talks involving aides.

 

On Sunday, Trump declined to say what his goals are for the summit. “I’ll let you know after the meeting,” Trump told CBS.

 

When asked whether he would request Putin extradite the Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking Democratic leaders during the 2016 election, Trump replied: “Well I might. I hadn’t thought of that.”

 

The summit comes three days after special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers, accusing them of meddling in election to help Trump win the White House.

Russia has no extradition treaty with the U.S. so it is unlikely that the Russia would turn the intelligence officials over to the U.S. to stand trial. Putin has denied trying to influence the vote.

 

Combative approach

 

Trump’s meeting with Putin will be closely watched — not only for possible deals that may emerge, but also for the personal interactions between the leaders of two countries long seen as competitors.

 

During his Europe tour, Trump has been combative with traditional U.S. allies at every stage — beginning at a NATO summit in Brussels, where he chastised European leaders for not spending more on defense.  

 

Ahead of his meeting in Britain, Trump criticized Prime Minister Theresa May’s approach to negotiations about Britain leaving the EU and suggested it could impact a proposed trade deal between London and Washington.  

 

The Trump-Putin meeting is being held in Finland, which is part of the EU but is not a full member of the NATO defense pact.

 

“Finland is one of those countries that both the United States and Russia appreciates,” explained Finnish Defense Forces Lt. Col. Jyri Raitasalo, a professor of war studies at the Finnish National Defense University. “It’s not involved in many of these most intense struggles between Russia and the West.”

 

On Monday, Trump will hold a bilateral meeting with Finnish President Sauli Niinisto, who has adopted a pragmatic approach toward Russia and the West.

 

Finland protests

 

Trump arrived in Finland about 9 p.m. local time (1800 UTC) after golfing at his course in Scotland. As in Britain, Trump is being greeted in the Finnish capital with large crowds of protesters.

 

Several thousand protesters gathered Sunday in Helsinki’s iconic Senate Square for a protest that gathered together activists focused on issues including the environment, refugee rights, and anti-war causes.

 

Some of protest signs read: “Dictators not welcome,” “Trump is Satan to the environment,” and “Stop Killing Journalists.”

Ken Bredemeier, Steve Herman contributed to this report.

 

 

 

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Trump’s Advice to Britain’s May: ‘Sue the EU’

U.S. President Donald Trump advised British Prime Minister Theresa May to sue the European Union instead of negotiating with the bloc, as part of her Brexit strategy.

 

“He told me I should sue the EU,” May told BBC television. “Sue the EU. Not go into negotiations — sue them.”

Her revelation about how Trump advised her ended several days of speculation about what advice the U.S. leader had offered the prime minister.

Trump said last week in an interview with The Sun newspaper that he had given May advice, but she did not follow it. The president told the newspaper ahead of his meeting with May that she “didn’t listen” to him.

“I would have done it much differently. I actually told Theresa May how to do it but she didn’t agree, she didn’t listen to me. She wanted to go a different route,” Trump said.

Trump did not reveal what advice he offered May in a press conference with her Friday. Instead, he said, “I think she found it too brutal.”

He added, “I could fully understand why she thought it was tough. And maybe someday she’ll do that. If they don’t make the right deal, she may do what I suggested, but it’s not an easy thing.”

May also told the BBC that the president had advised her not to walk away from the negotiations “because then you’re stuck.”

For the past few months, British politics have been obscured by squabbling, irritability and bravado about how, when and on what terms Britain will exit the European Union, and what the country’s relationship will be with its largest trading partner after Brexit.

Britons narrowly voted to leave the EU in a referendum in June 2016.

 

 

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Trump’s Advice to Britain’s May: ‘Sue the EU’

U.S. President Donald Trump advised British Prime Minister Theresa May to sue the European Union instead of negotiating with the bloc, as part of her Brexit strategy.

 

“He told me I should sue the EU,” May told BBC television. “Sue the EU. Not go into negotiations — sue them.”

Her revelation about how Trump advised her ended several days of speculation about what advice the U.S. leader had offered the prime minister.

Trump said last week in an interview with The Sun newspaper that he had given May advice, but she did not follow it. The president told the newspaper ahead of his meeting with May that she “didn’t listen” to him.

“I would have done it much differently. I actually told Theresa May how to do it but she didn’t agree, she didn’t listen to me. She wanted to go a different route,” Trump said.

Trump did not reveal what advice he offered May in a press conference with her Friday. Instead, he said, “I think she found it too brutal.”

He added, “I could fully understand why she thought it was tough. And maybe someday she’ll do that. If they don’t make the right deal, she may do what I suggested, but it’s not an easy thing.”

May also told the BBC that the president had advised her not to walk away from the negotiations “because then you’re stuck.”

For the past few months, British politics have been obscured by squabbling, irritability and bravado about how, when and on what terms Britain will exit the European Union, and what the country’s relationship will be with its largest trading partner after Brexit.

Britons narrowly voted to leave the EU in a referendum in June 2016.

 

 

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«Шпилясті кобзарі»: єдиний в Україні кобзарський коледж – під загрозою закриття

«Необхідно всього 12 студентів для набору курсу, щоб коледж і далі випускав нових бандуристів та кобзарів. Прийом документів триває до 25 липня»

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Порошенко: Церква в Україні має бути відділена від держави, особливо – від іноземної

Про це президент заявив під час участі у Всеукраїнській прощі у Зарваниці на Тернопільщині, приуроченій 1030-річчю Хрещення України-Русі

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Largest US Port Complex Braces for Extended US-China Trade War

Liang Liang is feeling a lot of stress lately. He owns an import wholesale business in Los Angeles.

“I have been watching the news every day — when will the tariffs be put in place? When are my goods arriving; it’s a fight against time. I’m trying to order all my products for the rest of the year,” he said. His goods, such as toys and T-shirts, come from China through the largest port complex in the United States, the twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

He expects a 10 to 20 percent increase in shipping costs because of the trade war between the United States and China.

Shipping costs likely to rise

China is the largest trading partner for both ports. As tariffs from both countries increase the cost of goods, manufacturers and retailers may order fewer products, which will cause a decrease in trade volume between the two countries, according to Stephen Cheung, president of the World Trade Center Los Angeles.

“Once that happens, you’re going to see an increase in the rates for shipping because then you don’t have the volume to justify the goods going back and forth,” he said.

Cheung explained that shipping costs will affect all goods between the U.S. and China, not just the ones on the list to be taxed. He said the trade and logistics sector, which includes the ports and the supply chain of trucks and warehouses, will be the first to feel the effects of the trade war.

Liang said he will absorb the cost and live with smaller profits, up to a point.

“If the tariffs increase by another 20 percent, we’ll have to raise our prices,” he said.

“The consumers are going to feel it in their wallets very quickly,” Cheung said.

​Supply chain may be less reliable

The U.S. as a manufacturing center depends on parts from China, but that supply may become less reliable as the trade war continues. Cheung said there may be uncertainty about whether the products will be produced or “whether they will be in the same price, so this potentially can have a huge aspect in terms of our exporting capability not only to China but to the rest of the world, Cheung said. “And there are a lot of jobs that are tied to this,” he added.

Officials at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles said it is too early to tell the impact of the trade tariffs.

“We’ll have to wait and see how various businesses restructure their supply networks and adjust to the tariff environment,” said Duane Kenagy, the Port of Long Beach’s interim deputy executive director.

He said so far, the port has seen record container volumes this year, but there is concern.

“The impacts of a sustained long-term trade war could be devastating to both economies,” Kenagy said.

Political theater?

Liang said he has hope, saying he thinks the trade war is actually political theater for the U.S. and China.

“China also has its position on trade. The Chinese government also has to be accountable to the 1.4 billion people of China. I think China and the U.S. will disagree over trade on the surface. (For Trump), it’s a show for the November midterm elections, so he can be accountable to the electorate,” Liang said.

Washington has been critical of China’s unfair trade practices and concerned with a trade imbalance. The U.S. imported more than $500 billion of Chinese goods last year compared to $130 billion of U.S. products exported to China.

These concerns and issues of American intellectual property are reasons the Trump administration announced tariffs on an additional $200 billion in Chinese imports.

“If you’re utilizing this as a tactic, that’s fine. What are the steps that you’re going to use to mitigate some of these damages that will be happening to the local community? These are huge issues that have not been addressed yet,” Cheung said.

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Largest US Port Complex Braces for Extended US-China Trade War

Liang Liang is feeling a lot of stress lately. He owns an import wholesale business in Los Angeles.

“I have been watching the news every day — when will the tariffs be put in place? When are my goods arriving; it’s a fight against time. I’m trying to order all my products for the rest of the year,” he said. His goods, such as toys and T-shirts, come from China through the largest port complex in the United States, the twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

He expects a 10 to 20 percent increase in shipping costs because of the trade war between the United States and China.

Shipping costs likely to rise

China is the largest trading partner for both ports. As tariffs from both countries increase the cost of goods, manufacturers and retailers may order fewer products, which will cause a decrease in trade volume between the two countries, according to Stephen Cheung, president of the World Trade Center Los Angeles.

“Once that happens, you’re going to see an increase in the rates for shipping because then you don’t have the volume to justify the goods going back and forth,” he said.

Cheung explained that shipping costs will affect all goods between the U.S. and China, not just the ones on the list to be taxed. He said the trade and logistics sector, which includes the ports and the supply chain of trucks and warehouses, will be the first to feel the effects of the trade war.

Liang said he will absorb the cost and live with smaller profits, up to a point.

“If the tariffs increase by another 20 percent, we’ll have to raise our prices,” he said.

“The consumers are going to feel it in their wallets very quickly,” Cheung said.

​Supply chain may be less reliable

The U.S. as a manufacturing center depends on parts from China, but that supply may become less reliable as the trade war continues. Cheung said there may be uncertainty about whether the products will be produced or “whether they will be in the same price, so this potentially can have a huge aspect in terms of our exporting capability not only to China but to the rest of the world, Cheung said. “And there are a lot of jobs that are tied to this,” he added.

Officials at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles said it is too early to tell the impact of the trade tariffs.

“We’ll have to wait and see how various businesses restructure their supply networks and adjust to the tariff environment,” said Duane Kenagy, the Port of Long Beach’s interim deputy executive director.

He said so far, the port has seen record container volumes this year, but there is concern.

“The impacts of a sustained long-term trade war could be devastating to both economies,” Kenagy said.

Political theater?

Liang said he has hope, saying he thinks the trade war is actually political theater for the U.S. and China.

“China also has its position on trade. The Chinese government also has to be accountable to the 1.4 billion people of China. I think China and the U.S. will disagree over trade on the surface. (For Trump), it’s a show for the November midterm elections, so he can be accountable to the electorate,” Liang said.

Washington has been critical of China’s unfair trade practices and concerned with a trade imbalance. The U.S. imported more than $500 billion of Chinese goods last year compared to $130 billion of U.S. products exported to China.

These concerns and issues of American intellectual property are reasons the Trump administration announced tariffs on an additional $200 billion in Chinese imports.

“If you’re utilizing this as a tactic, that’s fine. What are the steps that you’re going to use to mitigate some of these damages that will be happening to the local community? These are huge issues that have not been addressed yet,” Cheung said.