$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Євро-2020: Україна зіграла на виїзді внічию з Португалією

Є

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


На відкритті фестивалю Docudays UA закликали звільнити українських політв’язнів

22 березня на відкритті 16-го фестивалю документального кіно Docudays UA закликали звільнити українських політв’язнів. Про це повідомляє «Громадське».

У кінотеатрі «Жовтень», де проходила церемонія відкриття фестивалю, відбувся флешмоб #SaveOlegSentsov. Подібні акції будуть проходити протягом всього фестивалю.

Відкривала захід стрічка «Bellingcat: Правда у світі постправди» – історія про британське агентство, яке розслідує найрезонансніші справи, наприклад, катастрофу «Боїнга» МН-17 на Донбасі у 2014 році, або отруєння у Британії колишнього російського шпигуна Сергія Скрипаля.

Цього року на Docudays UA буде 27 українських фільмів: здебільшого це конкурсні роботи, але також тепер вперше з’являється позаконкурсна програма з шести стрічок «Національні географії»

Окрім того, ще два з позаконкурсних фільмів покажуть у рамках програми Docu/Хіти – це «Тато мамин брат» та «Домашні ігри».

Docudays UA триватиме до 30 березня на 15 локаціях. На відміну від попередніх років, цього разу організатори запланували два глядацькі дні (п’ятниця і субота), під час яких побачити переможців конкурсу та фестивальні хіти можна буде у комунальних кінотеатрах Києва.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


На відкритті фестивалю Docudays UA закликали звільнити українських політв’язнів

22 березня на відкритті 16-го фестивалю документального кіно Docudays UA закликали звільнити українських політв’язнів. Про це повідомляє «Громадське».

У кінотеатрі «Жовтень», де проходила церемонія відкриття фестивалю, відбувся флешмоб #SaveOlegSentsov. Подібні акції будуть проходити протягом всього фестивалю.

Відкривала захід стрічка «Bellingcat: Правда у світі постправди» – історія про британське агентство, яке розслідує найрезонансніші справи, наприклад, катастрофу «Боїнга» МН-17 на Донбасі у 2014 році, або отруєння у Британії колишнього російського шпигуна Сергія Скрипаля.

Цього року на Docudays UA буде 27 українських фільмів: здебільшого це конкурсні роботи, але також тепер вперше з’являється позаконкурсна програма з шести стрічок «Національні географії»

Окрім того, ще два з позаконкурсних фільмів покажуть у рамках програми Docu/Хіти – це «Тато мамин брат» та «Домашні ігри».

Docudays UA триватиме до 30 березня на 15 локаціях. На відміну від попередніх років, цього разу організатори запланували два глядацькі дні (п’ятниця і субота), під час яких побачити переможців конкурсу та фестивальні хіти можна буде у комунальних кінотеатрах Києва.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Former US Diplomats Slam Response to 2018 Russian Attack on Ukrainian Ships

Recent Western-imposed sanctions targeting Russia — spawned by a naval attack on Ukrainian soldiers on the Sea of Azov late last year — are too little, too late, say former top U.S. emissaries to the region.

The United States, in coordination with Canada and the European Union, leveled the sanctions on more than a dozen Russian officials and businesses earlier in March, citing Moscow’s “continued aggression in Ukraine.”

On Nov. 25, 2018, Russian Coast Guard vessels rammed and then seized a trio of Ukrainian naval vessels as they moved across international waters of the Black Sea en route from one Ukrainian port to another. The two dozen Ukrainian sailors aboard those ships have since been jailed in Moscow’s notorious Lefortovo prison.

“Where were we in March, April, May, June of 2018?” said former U.S. Ambassador Victoria Nuland of the timing of the latest sanctions. Nuland spoke in Washington at a recent roundtable event, titled, “Crimea after Five Years of Russian Occupation.”

Nuland was one of several former top State Department officials on hand at the roundtable jointly sponsored by U.S. Institute of Peace, the Ukrainian embassy and the Atlantic Council. Nuland, a former assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs, echoed criticism by retired U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine John Herbst, who was also in attendance.

“I know where George was [at that time],” she added, referring to George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs, who was also at the discussion. “But I don’t know where the rest of the administration and the rest of Europe were as the harassment of Ukrainian shipping was beginning, as the first efforts to gain control of that [maritime] territory were beginning.

“As has already been said, perhaps we didn’t want to see, so we waited until the crisis emerged. And even after the crisis, where were we in trying to increase our presence in the Black Sea?” Nuland said. “We’re only just getting there now. Where were we in terms of supporting Ukrainian naval capacity? Where were we in terms of a fast, ready-sanctions reaction?”

Six Russian officials, six defense firms, and two energy and construction firms were targeted with U.S. sanctions, either over the seizure of Ukrainian vessels in the Kerch Strait, or for their activities in Russian-annexed Crimea or separatist eastern Ukraine, according to a U.S. Treasury statement.

‘Late and weak’

Although current and former diplomats all expressed support for the latest sanctions, Herbst said they were still not enough.

“Western sanctions were late and weak,” Herbst later told VOA’s Ukrainian service. “If they’d been late and strong, I’d be celebrating, but they were weak. They sanctioned low-level officials and some Russian maritime-related firms. That’s it. They should have done something like sanction some high officials or family members of high officials, and they should have taken a major step like going after Gazprombank, which would’ve had a real impact on the Russian economy. That would tell [Russian President Vladimir] Putin, ‘Don’t escalate again, or you’re going to get stung.'”

Senior Atlantic Council Fellow Anders Aslund largely echoed that sentiment in a Kyiv Post opinion piece.

Support for Western response

Deputy Assistant Secretary Kent, head of the European and Eurasian Affairs directorate, pushed back on the criticism, pointing out that the U.S. did respond to the Sea of Azov events in real time.

“I think we made our response clear, both in immediately calling Secretary [of State Mike] Pompeo and calling President [Petro] Poroshenko the next day — as well as in our public comments condemning the attack and calling for the immediate release of both the ships and the sailors and personnel,” Kent told VOA.

“And if you recall, while there was a scheduled meeting later that week in Buenos Aires at the G-20, the U.S. and President [Donald] Trump canceled that meeting precisely because of the Russians’ refusal to release both the ships and the personnel who were — in violation of international law — seized and then detained,” he added. The G-20 group is made up of 20 of the world’s biggest economies.

Kent said the Trump administration is actively working to change the Kremlin’s “cost calculus” for aggression on foreign soil and on international waters.

Controversial referendum

In March 2014, Russia annexed Ukraine’s Black Sea peninsula in violation of the norms and standards of the international order. The Kremlin denies this charge, claiming that residents of Crimea voted in a referendum to secede from Ukraine.

The majority of the international community has not recognized the validity of the referendum.

Russia’s modernization efforts in the region include construction of a 19-kilometer (11.8-mile) bridge which opened last year across the Kerch Strait that links the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. The $3.6 billion project gave Crimea a land link to Russia. Previously, a ferry crossing that was often interrupted by gales served as the only connection.

This story originated in VOA’s Ukrainian Service. Pete Cobus contributed reporting.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Former US Diplomats Slam Response to 2018 Russian Attack on Ukrainian Ships

Recent Western-imposed sanctions targeting Russia — spawned by a naval attack on Ukrainian soldiers on the Sea of Azov late last year — are too little, too late, say former top U.S. emissaries to the region.

The United States, in coordination with Canada and the European Union, leveled the sanctions on more than a dozen Russian officials and businesses earlier in March, citing Moscow’s “continued aggression in Ukraine.”

On Nov. 25, 2018, Russian Coast Guard vessels rammed and then seized a trio of Ukrainian naval vessels as they moved across international waters of the Black Sea en route from one Ukrainian port to another. The two dozen Ukrainian sailors aboard those ships have since been jailed in Moscow’s notorious Lefortovo prison.

“Where were we in March, April, May, June of 2018?” said former U.S. Ambassador Victoria Nuland of the timing of the latest sanctions. Nuland spoke in Washington at a recent roundtable event, titled, “Crimea after Five Years of Russian Occupation.”

Nuland was one of several former top State Department officials on hand at the roundtable jointly sponsored by U.S. Institute of Peace, the Ukrainian embassy and the Atlantic Council. Nuland, a former assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs, echoed criticism by retired U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine John Herbst, who was also in attendance.

“I know where George was [at that time],” she added, referring to George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs, who was also at the discussion. “But I don’t know where the rest of the administration and the rest of Europe were as the harassment of Ukrainian shipping was beginning, as the first efforts to gain control of that [maritime] territory were beginning.

“As has already been said, perhaps we didn’t want to see, so we waited until the crisis emerged. And even after the crisis, where were we in trying to increase our presence in the Black Sea?” Nuland said. “We’re only just getting there now. Where were we in terms of supporting Ukrainian naval capacity? Where were we in terms of a fast, ready-sanctions reaction?”

Six Russian officials, six defense firms, and two energy and construction firms were targeted with U.S. sanctions, either over the seizure of Ukrainian vessels in the Kerch Strait, or for their activities in Russian-annexed Crimea or separatist eastern Ukraine, according to a U.S. Treasury statement.

‘Late and weak’

Although current and former diplomats all expressed support for the latest sanctions, Herbst said they were still not enough.

“Western sanctions were late and weak,” Herbst later told VOA’s Ukrainian service. “If they’d been late and strong, I’d be celebrating, but they were weak. They sanctioned low-level officials and some Russian maritime-related firms. That’s it. They should have done something like sanction some high officials or family members of high officials, and they should have taken a major step like going after Gazprombank, which would’ve had a real impact on the Russian economy. That would tell [Russian President Vladimir] Putin, ‘Don’t escalate again, or you’re going to get stung.'”

Senior Atlantic Council Fellow Anders Aslund largely echoed that sentiment in a Kyiv Post opinion piece.

Support for Western response

Deputy Assistant Secretary Kent, head of the European and Eurasian Affairs directorate, pushed back on the criticism, pointing out that the U.S. did respond to the Sea of Azov events in real time.

“I think we made our response clear, both in immediately calling Secretary [of State Mike] Pompeo and calling President [Petro] Poroshenko the next day — as well as in our public comments condemning the attack and calling for the immediate release of both the ships and the sailors and personnel,” Kent told VOA.

“And if you recall, while there was a scheduled meeting later that week in Buenos Aires at the G-20, the U.S. and President [Donald] Trump canceled that meeting precisely because of the Russians’ refusal to release both the ships and the personnel who were — in violation of international law — seized and then detained,” he added. The G-20 group is made up of 20 of the world’s biggest economies.

Kent said the Trump administration is actively working to change the Kremlin’s “cost calculus” for aggression on foreign soil and on international waters.

Controversial referendum

In March 2014, Russia annexed Ukraine’s Black Sea peninsula in violation of the norms and standards of the international order. The Kremlin denies this charge, claiming that residents of Crimea voted in a referendum to secede from Ukraine.

The majority of the international community has not recognized the validity of the referendum.

Russia’s modernization efforts in the region include construction of a 19-kilometer (11.8-mile) bridge which opened last year across the Kerch Strait that links the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. The $3.6 billion project gave Crimea a land link to Russia. Previously, a ferry crossing that was often interrupted by gales served as the only connection.

This story originated in VOA’s Ukrainian Service. Pete Cobus contributed reporting.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Кубок світу з біатлону: у спринтерській гонці Підручний фінішував 29-м

На 9-му етапі Кубка світу з біатлону в Голменколлені (Норвегія) 22 березня відбулася спринтерська гонка у чоловіків.

Перемогу здобув норвежець Йоганнес Тінгнес Бьо. Другим до фінішу прийшов італієць Лукас Хофер. Замкнув трійку лідерів француз Кантен Фійон Майє.

Найкращий результат серед українців показав Дмитро Підручний, який фінішував 29-м.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Кубок світу з біатлону: у спринтерській гонці Підручний фінішував 29-м

На 9-му етапі Кубка світу з біатлону в Голменколлені (Норвегія) 22 березня відбулася спринтерська гонка у чоловіків.

Перемогу здобув норвежець Йоганнес Тінгнес Бьо. Другим до фінішу прийшов італієць Лукас Хофер. Замкнув трійку лідерів француз Кантен Фійон Майє.

Найкращий результат серед українців показав Дмитро Підручний, який фінішував 29-м.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


GM Announces Jobs, Electric Vehicle After Trump Criticism

Less than a week after a series of critical tweets from the president over an Ohio plant closure, General Motors is announcing plans to add 400 jobs and build a new electric vehicle at a factory north of Detroit.

The company says it will spend $300 million at its plant in Orion Township, Michigan, to manufacture a Chevrolet vehicle based on the battery-powered Bolt.

GM wouldn’t say when the new workers will start or when the new vehicle will go on sale, nor would it say if the workers will be new hires or come from a pool of laid-off workers from the planned closings of four U.S. factories by January.

The company also announced plans Friday to spend about another $1.4 billion at U.S. factories with 300 more jobs but did not release a time frame or details.

The moves come after last weekend’s string of venomous tweets by President Donald Trump condemning GM for shutting its small-car factory in Lordstown, Ohio, east of Cleveland. During the weekend, Trump demanded that GM reopen the plant or sell it, criticized the local union leader and expressed frustration with CEO Mary Barra.

GM spokesman Dan Flores would not answer questions about Trump but said the investment has been in the works for weeks. Indeed, GM has said it planned to build more vehicles off the underpinnings of the Bolt, which can go an estimated 238 miles on a single electric charge. The company has promised to introduce 20 new all-electric vehicles globally by 2023.

In November, GM announced plans to shut the four U.S. factories and one in Canada. About 3,300 workers in the U.S. would lose their jobs, as well as 2,600 in Canada. Another 8,000 white-collar workers were targeted for layoff. The company said the moves are necessary to stay financially healthy as GM faces large capital expenditures to shift to electric and autonomous vehicles.

Plants slated for closure include Lordstown; Detroit-Hamtramck, Michigan; Warren, Michigan; White Marsh, Maryland, near Baltimore and Oshawa, Ontario near Toronto. The factories largely make cars or components for them, and cars aren’t selling well these days with a dramatic consumer shift to trucks and SUVs. With the closures, GM is canceling multiple car models due to slumping sales, including the Chevrolet Volt plug-in gas-electric hybrid.

GM has said it can place about 2,700 of the laid-off U.S. workers at other factories, but it’s unclear how many will uproot and take those positions. More than 1,100 have already transferred, and others are retiring.

The United Auto Workers has sued GM over the closings, which still must be negotiated with the union.

Trump’s latest GM tweet on Monday said GM should: “Close a plant in China or Mexico, where you invested so heavily pre-Trump,” and “Bring jobs home!”

Ohio and the area around the Lordstown plant are important to Trump’s 2020 re-election bid. The state helped push him to victory in 2016, and Trump has focused on Lordstown, seldom mentioning the other U.S. factories that GM is slated to close.

Barra has said that she sees no further layoffs or plant closures through the end of 2020.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


GM Announces Jobs, Electric Vehicle After Trump Criticism

Less than a week after a series of critical tweets from the president over an Ohio plant closure, General Motors is announcing plans to add 400 jobs and build a new electric vehicle at a factory north of Detroit.

The company says it will spend $300 million at its plant in Orion Township, Michigan, to manufacture a Chevrolet vehicle based on the battery-powered Bolt.

GM wouldn’t say when the new workers will start or when the new vehicle will go on sale, nor would it say if the workers will be new hires or come from a pool of laid-off workers from the planned closings of four U.S. factories by January.

The company also announced plans Friday to spend about another $1.4 billion at U.S. factories with 300 more jobs but did not release a time frame or details.

The moves come after last weekend’s string of venomous tweets by President Donald Trump condemning GM for shutting its small-car factory in Lordstown, Ohio, east of Cleveland. During the weekend, Trump demanded that GM reopen the plant or sell it, criticized the local union leader and expressed frustration with CEO Mary Barra.

GM spokesman Dan Flores would not answer questions about Trump but said the investment has been in the works for weeks. Indeed, GM has said it planned to build more vehicles off the underpinnings of the Bolt, which can go an estimated 238 miles on a single electric charge. The company has promised to introduce 20 new all-electric vehicles globally by 2023.

In November, GM announced plans to shut the four U.S. factories and one in Canada. About 3,300 workers in the U.S. would lose their jobs, as well as 2,600 in Canada. Another 8,000 white-collar workers were targeted for layoff. The company said the moves are necessary to stay financially healthy as GM faces large capital expenditures to shift to electric and autonomous vehicles.

Plants slated for closure include Lordstown; Detroit-Hamtramck, Michigan; Warren, Michigan; White Marsh, Maryland, near Baltimore and Oshawa, Ontario near Toronto. The factories largely make cars or components for them, and cars aren’t selling well these days with a dramatic consumer shift to trucks and SUVs. With the closures, GM is canceling multiple car models due to slumping sales, including the Chevrolet Volt plug-in gas-electric hybrid.

GM has said it can place about 2,700 of the laid-off U.S. workers at other factories, but it’s unclear how many will uproot and take those positions. More than 1,100 have already transferred, and others are retiring.

The United Auto Workers has sued GM over the closings, which still must be negotiated with the union.

Trump’s latest GM tweet on Monday said GM should: “Close a plant in China or Mexico, where you invested so heavily pre-Trump,” and “Bring jobs home!”

Ohio and the area around the Lordstown plant are important to Trump’s 2020 re-election bid. The state helped push him to victory in 2016, and Trump has focused on Lordstown, seldom mentioning the other U.S. factories that GM is slated to close.

Barra has said that she sees no further layoffs or plant closures through the end of 2020.

$1*/ mo hosting! Get going with us!


Шевченко: форма Роналду змушує нас хвилюватися

Головний тренер збірної України з футболу Андрій Шевченко назвав суттєвим підсиленням для команди Португалії повернення до її складу зіркового ветерана, 34-річного Кріштіану Роналду.

«Я дуже поважаю Кріштіану, це один із найкращих гравців в історії футболу. Та форма, яку він показав в останніх матчах, змушує нас хвилюватися. Та він не тільки чудовий гравець, але й лідер команди», – сказав Шевченко на передматчевій пре-конференції у Лісабоні.

Наставник «синьо-жовтих» відзначив, що його підопічні перебувають у добрій фізичній формі.

«Ми провели кілька занять, хлопці пристойно потренувалися. Був один навантажувальний день, і гравці чудово відреагували на ці випробування. Але найкращим тестом буде поєдинок. Ми розуміємо, що на гру з таким сильним суперником команда витратить чимало енергії й сил, буде багато рухатися. Але це вимоги сучасного футболу, які потрібно виконувати, якщо хочеш перебувати на високому рівні», – вказав Шевченко і додав, що його команда «розраховує взяти очки».

Увечері 22 березня збірна України з футболу зіграє з Португалією першу гру відбору на чемпіонат Європи 2020 року. Матч відбудеться на стадіоні «Ештадіу ду Бенфіка» в Лісабоні. Гра стартує о 21:45 за київським часом, у прямому ефірі її покажуть телеканали «Україна» та «Футбол 1». На думку букмекерів, фаворитом у цьому матчі є Португалія.

У відборі на Євро-2020 Україна змагається в групі з Португалією, Литвою, Люксембургом та Сербією. До фінальної стадії потраплять команди, які посядуть перші й другі місця у своїх групах. Наступний матч українці зіграють на виїзді з Люксембургом 25 березня.